Passionate people don’t wear their passion on their sleeves; they have it in their hearts.

Passionate people don’t wear their passion on their sleeves; they have it in their hearts. – Eric Schmidt and Jonathan Rosenberg

I know many people who talk about their passion; it is in their words, on posters in their office, and sticking on the window of their car. You know these people too . . . they talk the talk and are enthusiastic about the work.

I also know people who live their passion. It is more than words . . . it is action, dedication, and hard work. It is a commitment to the journey . . . it’s a desire for continued growth and improvement. The passion is a gift . . . it is fuel for life . . . it is at the core.

What is your passion? Is it in your heart or on your sleeve? When you wake-up in the morning, are you willing to work for it? To embrace the journey to elite?

Cultivate your passion. Plant the seed, do the work to grow your skills, and let others see it on your heart.

Negative leaders attack their team when there’s a problem. Positive leaders work with their team to attack the problem.

Negative leaders attack their team when there’s a problem. Positive leaders work with their team to attack the problem. – Jon Gordon

I am consistently befuddled at leaders who look to place blame. I’m surprised by those who’d rather point a finger at someone else rather than take the responsibility to find a solution.

We live in a world of distractions; we encounter detractors throughout our day. With our Stand Up and Own It value, we take responsibility for our response to others. As a leader, I can’t control what others do – all I can do is control me, my response, and my behavior.

Don’t let others suck you into the abyss of blaming and complaining. Don’t let the misbehavior of others take you below the line . . . take you to lower levels of effectiveness. Rise up . . . solve problems instead of placing blame. Tune out those who only seek to pull down the organization – trumpet teamwork and own the solution.

Feeling gratitude and not expressing it is like wrapping a present and not giving it.

As this holiday weekend comes to an end we prepare to return to work and school for a couple of weeks before our winter break. Over the next several weeks, don’t lose your Thanksgiving spirit. Take the time to thank those in your lives that make you a better person, recognize people who push you to be a better version of you, and recognize friends or colleagues that bring joy to your life.

Don’t let Thanksgiving be limited to a single day or a long weekend. We are more joyful when we give thanks every day. We are happier when we recognize those around us who make our lives better. We are more productive and successful when we live, work, and learn in environments of gratitude.

It is completely up to you . . . it can’t be left to other people. Take the initiative, step up, and give the gift of thanks every day during this holiday season.

As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them.

As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them. – John Fitzgerald Kennedy

On Thanksgiving Day we take time to reflect on the many blessings in our lives. We spend time with family and friends; we enjoy annual traditions and celebrate the start of the holiday season.

It’s easy on Thanksgiving Day, during the holiday weekend, to keep what’s most important on our minds and in our hearts. What’s difficult is to keep what’s most important in the forefront when we return to the daily grind of life and school.

On this day of giving thanks, don’t only utter words of thanks, but make the commitment to live your life in a spirit of thanksgiving. We must keep what’s most important on our minds and in our hearts every day of the year.

Life isn’t about finding yourself. Life is about creating yourself.

Life isn’t about finding yourself. Life is about creating yourself. – George Bernard Shaw

Too often, we paint a confusing picture for young people. Too often, we make it sound like passion and innovation alone will lead to future success and happiness. Too often, we promote creativity and permit voice and choice as the foundation for education. Why is this a faulty proposition? It’s only half the equation . . . it is missing a key component.

Life isn’t only about discovering your passion . . . it is about the work it takes to live your passion at an elite level. Once you discover your passion – and for many the journey is as important as the destination – you must work to cultivate the required skills into future success.

Finding yourself is only the starting line . . . creating yourself is the journey to success. Students today need to develop the foundational skills, instill a work ethic grounded in pride in one’s self and hard work, and perpetuate a desire for lifelong learning and growth.

Culture is the reason why the best organizations have sustained success. When you create a culture of greatness you enjoy great results.

Culture is the reason why the best organizations have sustained success. When you create a culture of greatness you enjoy great results. – Jon Gordon

Organizations should have strategic plans. Organizations must create processes for daily operation. Organizations must set goals and do the work to achieve results.

Development of culture . . . the intentional focus on behavior . . . doesn’t detract from the need to do the work. Great results take both a great culture and great skill. Culture work isn’t enough. It’s the culture that drives the behavior. It’s the culture that supports the grind of doing the work every day. It’s the culture that embraces the productive discomfort of change . . . of a growth mindset.

Don’t get lulled into thinking that simply focusing on culture is enough. Life requires balance and work – building the culture and doing the work at the same time.

A healthy culture embraces challenge, active debate, and robust conversation.

A healthy culture embraces challenge, active debate, and robust conversation.

 In the Hilliard School District we embrace the Power of the Team – we know we are stronger together.  One of the aspects of every strong team, of every successful organization, is a culture that encourages collaboration and teamwork.

Does your team encourage challenging authority and ideas?  Does your team demand you to take different positions, to look at situations through a different lens?

You are not making your team better by being a “yes, man” or by accepting the status quo.  You are not making your team stronger by abdicating to those with a lofty title or organizational responsibility.  Today, commit to make your team better by actively listening and then purposefully challenging ideas and positions.  Challenge everything . . . it will make the entire team strong in all areas and functions.